Nurturing Thursday: Learning

Develop a passion for learning. If you do, you will never cease to grow ~ Anthony J. D’Angelo
My biology general knowledge is very limited. WordPress or to be precise my fellow bloggers have helped me learning about many new things. Few days ago I shared a photo in macro photography.  I had no information about this little beauty.  Mick Canning of My writings shared the name of the insect. It was “Burnett Moth”, til then I have never heard about it. Hurray I learned something.

This is a five-spot burnet moth.  Here are some images of moths.

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A closer look!
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Do you name it?
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Is this a moth or a butterfly?

Some butterflies from archive (are they really butterflies 😀 )

How to distinguish between a moth and a butterfly:

  • Read:
  1. https://www.kidsbutterfly.org/faq/general/3
  2. https://www.livescience.com/34472-difference-between-moth-butterfly.html

This post is inspired by Becca’s Nurturing Thursday theme and Mick’s share your knowledge idea.

Love is all around us!

  • Pigeons are monogamous; i.e., they mate for life, and the survivor accepts a new mate only slowly. [https://www.britannica.com/animal/pigeon]
  •  Pigeons are thought to be monogamous but there are no studies, to our knowledge, which verify this assumption using  molecular techniques. To establish positive familial relationships between parents and offspring, DNA fingerprinting  studies are being conducted on ten established pairs. Pairs are identified by observation and blood is collected from  adults and chicks. DNA isolated from the blood is dialyzed, digested with the restriction endonuclease Hae III, and the fragments are transferred to nylon membranes.  The membranes are probed using radioactively labeled Jeffreys’ probes,
    which are multilocus probes used to identify banding patterns in DNA.  Probing of the membranes is performed by Dr. Patricia Parker at Ohio State University.  Banding patterns are compared between parents and offspring. Results obtained to date show that pigeons are monogamous. [http://science.widener.edu/~vatnick/Monogamy.htm]
  • An interesting read [http://nautil.us/issue/33/attraction/what-pigeons-teach-us-about-love]

This post is inspired by Kate’s Friday Foto Fun

 

Macro Monday: 1/19

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Usally I don’t check the camera setting but since I have asked to mention the same. Here is it: 1/1250 sek. f/5,6 300 mm. I didn’t want to disturb the fly hence it was taken from quite a distance and even then I had to crop the sides to make it better visible.

This image was taken in southern Italy.

Here I go again!

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To begin our photography journey in year 2019, Amy has given a wonderful theme for Lens-Artists-Photo-Challenge this week. I decided to post just one photo today, hope you like this iphone image. I shall try to post a few photos from earlier travels but right now time is a big constraint.

I came back a week ago after 3 weeks stay in India ( can’t call it vacation as I travelled from one home to another). We had to cancel our vacation plans due to some emergency in our family.  Now I am back to work and in a few weeks time I shall be travelling again. Let’s see if I can manage to relax then.

This time will be heading to a far far west place, “California”. Any suggestions on do’s and donts in the region are most welcome.

Cheers!