Weekend 88 : Distance

sundaytree_29mars20sundaytree_29mars20_2

For Becca’s Sunday Trees

weekend88_1weekend88_2

There is a silent deference for one another, a distance that is kept, and lines that aren’t crossed, but in their sharing, they each try to pay tribute to the bond in their own way. As often as possible, they open up a little and give what they can.          Dan Groat

weekend88_3weekend88_4

Friendships – and indeed most relationships – are measured in the closeness of hearts, minds and soul ties… not in the distance of physical miles or even the passing of time. ~ Rasheed Ogunlaru

Jo’s Monday Walk

Lens-Artists-Photo-Challenge

Friday Fun – New normality

 

 

It’s about people, not politics…

coronaupdates

norway_shuttingNorway shuts down to control Corona

 

WHAT IS SOCIAL DISTANCING AND HOW CAN IT SLOW THE SPREAD OF COVID-19?

How do I practice social distancing?
The CDC defines social distancing as it applies to COVID-19 as “remaining out of congregrate settings, avoiding mass gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.”

This means, says Rivers, “no hugs, no handshakes.”

It’s particularly important—and perhaps obvious—to maintain a that same 6-foot distance from anyone who is demonstrating signs of illness, including coughing, sneezing, or fever.

Along with physical distance, proper hand-washing is important for protecting not only yourself, but others around you—because the virus can be spread even without symptoms.

“Don’t wait for evidence that that there’s circulation [of COVID-19] in your community,” says Rivers. “Go ahead and step up that hand-washing right now, because it really does help to reduce transmission.”

Ref: https://hub.jhu.edu/2020/03/13/what-is-social-distancing/?fbclid=IwAR3Sw6VKoEigNF8jiFKZU6ZFC_PKtbiwi6VnsjWqvlSGk9R_3NhncsAgKmk

 

How to avoid the spread of coronavirus when travelling

Security checks are thought to be the highest risk areas in airports. A study published by researchers from the University of Nottingham and the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare found that half of all plastic luggage trays at security checks were harbouring at least one respiratory disease such as the common cold or influenza.
Scientists have been planning for a pandemic for decades and transport hubs are widely regarded as infection hotspots, with virus transmission rates up to six times higher for those using public transport systems.

Ref: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/science-and-disease/coronavirus-how-avoid-spread-tips-transport/?fbclid=IwAR3fEydd1BcVeUhbLdlMrzcQ9czx4vXqAtUzOexwnWmjVMny2D4jT3acXNk

We Knew Disease X Was Coming. It’s Here Now.

We need to stop what drives mass epidemics rather than just respond to individual diseases.

“We live in dense and highly connected populations. Pandemics are inevitable. The ways we fund health science (slowly, meagerly) and finance health systems (inadequately, inequitably) are simply not up to the task of preventing them.”

Ref: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/27/opinion/coronavirus-pandemics.html?fbclid=IwAR3qp9RhZp82ratipHHDgVxqgSfVdeyb9OEX9IjI-3knK1loSLgP-gYLwWw

Advice from Norwegian institute of public health

corona_habit

 

 

Change your perspective!

lac_02mars20

What we do see depends mainly on what we look for. … In the same field the farmer will notice the crop, the geologists the fossils, botanists the flowers, artists the colouring, sportmen the cover for the game. Though we may all look at the same things, it does not all follow that we should see them ~
John Lubbock (The Beauties of Nature and the Wonders of the World We Live in)

lac_02mars20_2

You have the ability to choose your reactions ~ Steve Maraboli ( Life, the Truth, and Being Free)

lac_02mars20_3

It’s a funny thing about life, once you begin to take note of the things you are grateful for, you begin to lose sight of the things that you lack ~ Germany Kent

Lens-Artists-Photo-Challenge   &  Friday Fun: Fabulous