Weekend: National day

Every year on May 17, Norwegians shed their typically reserved shell to dress up, hit the streets and party. It’s a day full of national pride, yet there’s no displays of military power and the politicians keep quiet. Norway’s Constitution Day is all about the children.

The lack of military parades is perhaps the most notable difference about Norway’s Constitution Day compared to many other countries around the world. Instead, the main parade is full of children from local schools, often in marching bands. Proud parents watch on with smartphone cameras at the ready before joining a people’s parade later in the day.

Some highlights of the day’s parade.

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Also joining the people’s parade are Norway’s high school graduates. Known as russ, they are easy to spot in their brightly-colored overalls. On May 17, they are likely to be taking it easy as the day marks the culmination of a two-week period of partying that is seen as a rite-of-passage by most Norwegians.

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I was invited for tradition brunch/lunch with a norwegian family. I met the 94 years grandma, a fantastic enthusiastic lady. She is still actively living in her own house. She talked about flowers, garden, grocery shopping and even she told us about her country tour on bicycle during war time.

The whole event reminds me of celebrating festivals in India. The table was full of fantastic traditional dishes. Members of extended family paying small visits and tasting the food. It was a sunny day and as we were sitting outside, passing neighbours were stopping by for a moment and some even dropped in and enjoyed their share of champagne. All in all it was a fantastic day for everyone.

My contribution for Jo’s Monday walk and lens-artists-photo-challenge as I see the parade an example of lively street art.

Reference article:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidnikel/2019/05/15/syttende-mai-how-norway-celebrates-its-national-day/

Pillars and Domes – Architectural elements

Before the Romans, all buildings in the ancient world were rectangular or square-shaped. Look at the picture of the ancient Greek temple called the Parthenon. This structure has 46 outer pillars and 23 inner pillars. The majestic pillars that are
associated with Greek architecture were not there to just look pretty. The pillars of the Parthenon were there to hold up, or support the heavy marble roof that used to be on the top of this massive structure.

The Parthenon
The Parthenon

There are many amazing architectural corinthian, doric, and ionic columns and ancient Egyptian obelisks in Rome, where most of them were erected to the glory of the emperors. The most famous Roman pillars were created in the centuries of the rule of Marcus Aurelius, Trajan, and other significant historical figures.

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Ancient pillars in Rome.

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At the Tomb of the Unknown Solider in Rome.

Advancements in mathematics, materials, and production techniques since that time resulted in new dome types. dome is an architectural element that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere. Domes have a long architectural lineage that extends back into prehistory and they have been constructed from mud, snow, stone, wood, brick, concrete, metal, glass, and plastic over the centuries. The symbolism associated with domes includes mortuary, celestial, and governmental traditions that have likewise developed over time.

Domes have been found from early Mesopotamia, which may explain the form’s spread. They are found in Persian, Hellenistic, Roman, and Chinese architecture in the Ancient world, as well as among a number of contemporary indigenous building traditions. Dome structures were popular in Byzantine and medieval Islamic architecture, and there are numerous examples from Western Europe in the Middle Ages. The Renaissance architectural style spread from Italy in the Early modern period.

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Berlin Cathedral church
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The French church in Berlin

These are for last week’s Lens-Artists-Photo-Challenge: Architecture.