Floral Friday

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Flowers don’t worry about how they’re going to bloom. They just open up and turn toward the light and that makes them beautiful.  ~Jim Carrey

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Random reading and fun!

The likes and dislikes of one are part of their personality and somewhere deep down lies the reasons for such choices either good or bad. The outer appearance of a person might be totally different than the person.

Think about a situation where two neighbours staying together for decades hating each other. If a murder was free who knows they might have tried hard. Their lives flow independent of each other but at a right moment the curves of their lives not only crossed each other but they got tangled.

For a certain reason they stick together and tried to help each other despite their differences but yes at the end they donot become friends. Still life goes on.

A couple of weeks ago I had to pick a book with not much time in hand. I chose a book by Yemande Omotoso, “The woman next door“.  At the end I felt like it was not a bad bet after all.

Then soon after it, I started with Roberta Gately’s “Lipstick in Afganistan“. Roberta has served as a nurse and humanitarian aid worker in the third world war zones including Afganistan. We donot see the real suffering of the people but still was a good read.  A new angle.

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In the mean time Brenda of  “a mediative journey”, in her post “a fatherless child” introduced me to Frances Hodgson Burnett and her book, “A little princess” . Though it is a children book,  I enjoyed it thinking if only all the stories have happy endings the millions of children suffering around the world would have had some hope. A hope for better tomorrow.

Do not read, as children do, to amuse yourself, or like the ambitious, for the purpose of instruction. No, read in order to live ~ Gustave Flaubert

 

 

Weekend: National day

Every year on May 17, Norwegians shed their typically reserved shell to dress up, hit the streets and party. It’s a day full of national pride, yet there’s no displays of military power and the politicians keep quiet. Norway’s Constitution Day is all about the children.

The lack of military parades is perhaps the most notable difference about Norway’s Constitution Day compared to many other countries around the world. Instead, the main parade is full of children from local schools, often in marching bands. Proud parents watch on with smartphone cameras at the ready before joining a people’s parade later in the day.

Some highlights of the day’s parade.

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Also joining the people’s parade are Norway’s high school graduates. Known as russ, they are easy to spot in their brightly-colored overalls. On May 17, they are likely to be taking it easy as the day marks the culmination of a two-week period of partying that is seen as a rite-of-passage by most Norwegians.

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I was invited for tradition brunch/lunch with a norwegian family. I met the 94 years grandma, a fantastic enthusiastic lady. She is still actively living in her own house. She talked about flowers, garden, grocery shopping and even she told us about her country tour on bicycle during war time.

The whole event reminds me of celebrating festivals in India. The table was full of fantastic traditional dishes. Members of extended family paying small visits and tasting the food. It was a sunny day and as we were sitting outside, passing neighbours were stopping by for a moment and some even dropped in and enjoyed their share of champagne. All in all it was a fantastic day for everyone.

My contribution for Jo’s Monday walk and lens-artists-photo-challenge as I see the parade an example of lively street art.

Reference article:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidnikel/2019/05/15/syttende-mai-how-norway-celebrates-its-national-day/