Wordless Wednesday

ww_04july18

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TO THE FOURTH OF JULY : Poem by Swami Vivekananda

It is well known that Swami Vivekananda’s death (or resurrection, as some of us would prefer to call it!) took place on the 4th of July, 1902. On the 4th of July, 1898, he was travelling with some American disciples in Kashmir, and as part of a domestic conspiracy for the celebration of the day — the anniversary of the American Declaration of Independence — he prepared the following poem, to be read aloud at the early breakfast. The poem itself fell to the keeping of Dhirâ Mâtâ.

Behold, the dark clouds melt away, 
That gathered thick at night, and hung 
So like a gloomy pall above the earth! 
Before thy magic touch, the world 
Awakes. The birds in chorus sing. 
The flowers raise their star-like crowns — 
Dew-set, and wave thee welcome fair. 
The lakes are opening wide in love 
Their hundred thousand lotus-eyes 
To welcome thee, with all their depth. 
All hail to thee, thou Lord of Light! 
A welcome new to thee, today, 
O Sun! Today thou sheddest Liberty

Bethink thee how the world did wait, 
And search for thee, through time and clime. 
Some gave up home and love of friends, 
And went in quest of thee, self-banished, 
Through dreary oceans, through primeval forests, 
Each step a struggle for their life or death; 
Then came the day when work bore fruit, 
And worship, love, and sacrifice, 
Fulfilled, accepted, and complete. 
Then thou, propitious, rose to shed 
The light of Freedom on mankind. 

Move on, O Lord, in thy resistless path! 
Till thy high noon o’erspreads the world. 
Till every land reflects thy light, 
Till men and women, with uplifted head, 
Behold their shackles broken, and 
Know, in springing joy, their life renewed!

Resource: http://media.belurmath.org/to-the-fourth-of-july-poem-by-vivekananda-76#

Weekend (57) – Aurlandsfjord

Yesterday our journey began with a tour to narrow Norwegian fjords. We enjoyed the  spectacular views and the countless waterfalls.  These are classic, superbly developed fjords, considered as the type locality for fjord landscapes in the world. They are comparable in scale and quality to other existing fjords on the World Heritage List and are distinguished by the climate and geological setting.  (Tourism pressures are intense in fjords, but impacts are limited as most visitors access the property on cruise ships during a short visitor season. (https://www.fjordtours.com/things-to-do-in-norway/the-norwegian-fjords/).

Later we continued our journey from a small scenic village called Flåm (at sea level) towards a small place Myrdal (up on the mountain) in a little train called “Flåmsbana”. It takes about one hour to cover distance of 20.2 km long track through 20 tunnels. The journey provides a panoramic view of Norwegian mountain landscape.

Here are some pictures taken on cruise and on the train showcasing natural beauty:

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Kårdal village
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21 hairpin turns to Kårdal (556 m above sea level)
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Kjofossen waterfall – visible only on train ride
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Last station on Flåm train.

At Myrdal we decided to walk back to Flåm.  The first part of the walk is a narrow path that drops down towards the river.

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The narrow pathway looks quite flat in the beginning

Walking for 50m or so comes a real slope and with a series of 21 hairpin bends. One feels like if one has walked a lot while covering around 1.5 km. The loose gravel path is very steep and it is difficult on knees. But this is the only difficult part of 20.2 km hike/walk. Myrdal – Flåm hike is a wonderful experience.  There are numerous waterfalls and the views are dynamic and breathtaking all the way til Flåm. A guarantee of 100% oxygen and the only noise we hear is either of rushing water or goats from nearby farms or little birds.

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The sound of rushing water accompany us through out the journey.

 

The path from Myrdal to Flåm is not very well marked but impossible to get lost.
More informaiton on flåmsbana
Thank you for reading!

Photo Study: Rule of thirds

A few days ago I saw a very nice post by Helen and her post  directed me to a wonderful post by Brenda on “the rule of thirds“.  A rule which is used to create a well balanced photograph. After all it is important to know where to place our object(s) in the frame.

Taken from Brenda’s text, “the rule of thirds is the element of composition that begins with dividing an image into thirds, horizontally and vertically, creating nine imagined sections. ”

On Brenda’s post I thoroughly enjoyed a video by Saurav Sinha about composition.

The theory is that if you place points of interest in the intersections or along the lines than your photo becomes more balanced and will enable a viewer of the image to interact with it more naturally. (https://digital-photography-school.com/rule-of-thirds/

After going through the theory, I am presenting four images taken at different time points with different purposes.

In my first image, I wanted to include the colourful background (which was created due to clear sky and green branches)

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In the second image, the object is crocus and the idea was to present crocuses from a close distance but also to give a view of crocus field.

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One more image using the rule and adding some background.

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Lastly an example where the photo is centred.

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Some interesting information:

The rule of thirds was first written down by John Thomas Smith in 1797. In his book Remarks on Rural Scenery, Smith quotes a 1783 work by Sir Joshua Reynolds, in which Reynolds discusses, in unquantified terms, the balance of dark and light in a painting. John Thomas Smith then continues with an expansion on the idea, naming it the “Rule of thirds”

Smith’s conception of the rule is meant to apply more generally than the version commonly explained today, as he recommends it not just for dividing the frame, but also for all division of straight lines, masses, or groups. On the other hand, he does not discuss the now-common idea that intersections of the third-lines of the frame are particularly strong or interesting for composition.

Resource: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thirds

I hope I have done justice and created interesting images. I would love to read any comments.

Thanks for reading.

 

तकलीफ़

दुनिया में सबसे ज्यादा तकलीफ़,

माँ-बाप की बेबसी पर होती है।

-रुपाली

Duniya mein sabse jyada taleef,

ma-baap ki bebasi par hoti hai


नामी  शायर की रचना 

 

दिल की तकलीफ़ कम नहीं करते 

अब कोई शिकवा हम नहीं करते। 

-जौन एलिया