Hideaway: Matter of choosing a window

We can find true refuge within our own hearts and minds-right here, right now, in the midst of our moment-to-moment lives ~Tara Brach

We all need a place that is safe and wholesome enough for us to return for refuge. In Buddhism, that refuge is mindfulness ~ Nhat Hanh

What we think of as our refuge and sanctuary, could easily become the place of our captivity~ Mladen Đorđević

Six words Saturday

Lens artists photo challenge

Weekend 108: Autumnal stroll

Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience~ Ralph Waldo Emerson.

The images of wild roses were taken a couple of weeks ago. The colours were so different. Some trees were showing yellow shades but all was mostly green.

On Sunday we had been on our usual hike/walk. Unsure of weather in near future I insisted to go on a nearby mountain. It was perfect for hiking cold but sunny. Autumn sun makes every thing beautiful.

Let nature take its course. By letting each thing act in accordance with its own nature, everything that needs to be done gets done ~ Lao Tzu.

The last eight months we are at home and trying to cope with our new normals. Instead of discussing things which are out of our control we focused our energy on simple feasible tasks. We are happy with what we achieved.

Live in each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influence of the earth. ~Henry David Thoreau

Festival of leaves

Walktober

Nurturing Thursday

Hope you enjoy the post. Stay healthy and happy.

Communication…

Human communication was revolutionized with the origin of speech approximately 500,000 BCE. Symbols were developed about 30,000 years ago. The imperfection of speech, which nonetheless allowed easier dissemination of ideas and eventually resulted in the creation of new forms of communications, improving both the range at which people could communicate and the longevity of the information. All of those inventions were based on the key concept of the symbol.

This week’s theme for Lens artists photo challenge: communication is quite interesting and thus I spend more time in reading about it than creating my own post.

For anyone working with species determination of crustaceans, the publications and drawings of Professor Georg Ossian Sars (1837-1927) are an indispensable tool. Sars’ main work, An Account of the Crustacea of ​​Norway, describes most crustaceans in Norway, and is an international standard work to this day. The work was published in the period 1895–1928 and consists of nine volumes of a total of 4,000 pages, thoroughly illustrated with brilliant drawings.

The ability to communicate effectively with other individuals plays a critical role in the lives of all animals. Whether we are examining how moths attract a mate, ground squirrels convey information about nearby predators, or chimpanzees maintain positions in a dominance hierarchy, communication systems are involved.

Studying communication not only gives us insight into the inner worlds of animals, but also allows us to better answer important evolutionary questions. A thorough understanding of animal communication systems can also be critical for making effective decisions about conservation of threatened and endangered species. As an example, recent research has focused on understanding how human-generated noise (from cars, trains, etc) can impact communication in a variety of animals. 

Don’t use words too big for the subject. Don’t say infinitely when you mean very; otherwise you’ll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite.~ C.S. Lewis

References:

Hope you enjoy the post.