Let cat out of the bag!

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Tian Tan Buddha is a large bronze statue of Buddha Shakyamuni at Ngong Ping, Lantau Island, in Hong Kong

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The Villa d’Este is a 16th-century villa in Tivoli, near Rome, famous for its terraced hillside Italian Renaissance garden and especially for its profusion of fountains. It is now an Italian state museum, and is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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The Ghibli Clock (officially called NI-Tele Really BIG Clock) is a large clock and sculpture designed by Hayao Miyazaki, installed outside the Nittele Tower (located close to Shiodome Station) in Tokyo, Japan. The structure is made of copper and steel.

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 Giant chess board in the Rijksmuseum gardens in Amsterdam

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Charles Bridge is a medieval stone arch bridge that crosses the Vltava river in Prague, Czech Republic. Its construction started in 1357 under the auspices of King Charles IV, and finished in the early 15th century.

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Calle Marqués de Larios, also known simply as Calle Larios, is a pedestrian and shopping street in Málaga, Spain. The street was inaugurated on 27 August, 1891. 

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Back side of the French Church of Friedrichstadt at the Gendarmenmarkt in Berlin, Germany.

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Toledo is an ancient city set on a hill above the plains of Castilla-La Mancha in central Spain. The capital of the region, it’s known for the medieval Arab, Jewish and Christian monuments in its walled old city. 

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Ulriken is the highest of the Seven Mountains that surround the city of Bergen, Norway. It has a height of 643 metres above sea level.

Six Word Saturday

Travel Challenge – Day 7

I was nominated by our fellow blogger Derrick Knight to post one favourite travel picture a day for ten days without explanation, then to nominate someone else to participate. That’s 10 days, 10 travel pictures and 10 nominations. Instead of nominating one person I would like to invite everyone of you to participate.

Be kind and post at least one of your favourite travel photo. Please link to me so I know you have participated. If you are not interested, no problem.

Nowhere in the rules does it say you can’t guess where the photo was taken.

Stay safe, stay healthy and be kind.

Travel Challenge – Day 6

I was nominated by our fellow blogger Derrick Knight to post one favourite travel picture a day for ten days without explanation, then to nominate someone else to participate. That’s 10 days, 10 travel pictures and 10 nominations. Instead of nominating one person I would like to invite everyone of you to participate.

Be kind and post at least one of your favourite travel photo. Please link to me so I know you have participated. If you are not interested, no problem.

Nowhere in the rules does it say you can’t guess where the photo was taken.

Stay safe, stay healthy and be kind.

Pillars and Domes – Architectural elements

Before the Romans, all buildings in the ancient world were rectangular or square-shaped. Look at the picture of the ancient Greek temple called the Parthenon. This structure has 46 outer pillars and 23 inner pillars. The majestic pillars that are
associated with Greek architecture were not there to just look pretty. The pillars of the Parthenon were there to hold up, or support the heavy marble roof that used to be on the top of this massive structure.

The Parthenon
The Parthenon

There are many amazing architectural corinthian, doric, and ionic columns and ancient Egyptian obelisks in Rome, where most of them were erected to the glory of the emperors. The most famous Roman pillars were created in the centuries of the rule of Marcus Aurelius, Trajan, and other significant historical figures.

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Ancient pillars in Rome.

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At the Tomb of the Unknown Solider in Rome.

Advancements in mathematics, materials, and production techniques since that time resulted in new dome types. dome is an architectural element that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere. Domes have a long architectural lineage that extends back into prehistory and they have been constructed from mud, snow, stone, wood, brick, concrete, metal, glass, and plastic over the centuries. The symbolism associated with domes includes mortuary, celestial, and governmental traditions that have likewise developed over time.

Domes have been found from early Mesopotamia, which may explain the form’s spread. They are found in Persian, Hellenistic, Roman, and Chinese architecture in the Ancient world, as well as among a number of contemporary indigenous building traditions. Dome structures were popular in Byzantine and medieval Islamic architecture, and there are numerous examples from Western Europe in the Middle Ages. The Renaissance architectural style spread from Italy in the Early modern period.

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Berlin Cathedral church

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The French church in Berlin

These are for last week’s Lens-Artists-Photo-Challenge: Architecture.