Goodbye June

During summer, nearly all Norwegian goats/sheeps are released for open grazing that generally lasts for around three months. I took this image near a barn in May but now almost all barns are empty.

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Unique experience

Approximately two million sheep are grazing in the outlying fields of Norway every summer. That’s unique, and something that you won’t experience elsewhere.

“In Norway, the resource situation is different than in the rest of Scandinavia and other comparable countries. Only three per cent of Norway’s landmass is arable land, but 45 percent is usable or excellent grazing land”, says Tone Våg, sheep farmer and leader of the Norwegian Sheep and Goat Association.

Våg continues: “Norwegian agriculture is dependent on the extra resource of the outlying fields, and pasture is an important source of income for Norwegian farms”.

Boundless sheep

Sheep grazing in outlying fields have free access to whatever they want to eat. That makes the Norwegian sheep happy.

“When you’re taking the sheep to their summer grazing land in the mountains you can hear the happy sounds from the herd. You can tell from how they’re acting that they remember from year to year”, Våg says.

Grazing without fences allows the sheep to act more in tune with their instincts, and they naturally divide into smaller groups with individuals closely related to one another.

If you occasionally encounter sheep far into the wild, you normally don’t need to worry: “Sheep recognises where they are, and they know where they are going” Våg says.

The green caretakers

Whilst out grazing, it occasionally happens that sheep get ill, get stuck or lost – or that they encounter predators. They are, however, not completely left to themselves.

“It’s statutory to check on flock at least once a week during the whole summer. Therefore, it’s not only the tourists who can enjoy the sight of sheep grazing in the nature. I feel privileged that I can take my family with me into the mountains to look after the animals as a part of my regular work”, Våg says.

Another factor is that grazing sheep are preventing the landscape from overgrowing and maintains the biodiversity in the Norwegian nature. According to Våg, almost 300 endangered species are dependent on the Norwegian cultural landscape.

“It’s not overgrown nature the tourists come to see”, says the farmer.

RESOURCE: https://www.visitnorway.com/places-to-go/fjord-norway/happy-sheep/

My first entry to Photo a day Challenge

Just a walk

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Come along,                                                                                                                                       walk with me.                                                                                                                                 Enjoy the beauty,                                                                                                                                    outside and inside.

 

Weekend Walk 93

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I felt my lungs inflate with the onrush of scenery—air, mountains, trees, people. I thought, “This is what it is to be happy. Sylvia Plath (The Bell Jar)

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“…and then, I have nature and art and poetry, and if that is not enough, what is enough?”~ Vincent Willem van Gogh

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Live in each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.~ Henry David Thoreau

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Inspired by Becca’s Sunday Trees & Jo’s Monday Walk

Just a walk…

As I said in my previous post, last Thursday we had our annual ski/tour day in my office. It’s like a team building activity. I opted to join the tour/hiking group. Here are some images which I dedicated to Jo’s Monday walk theme,  its been a while since I participate in it.

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Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature — the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter.
 ~ Rachel Carson (Silent Spring)

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Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity ~ John Muir (Our National Parks)

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Some places were difficult to walk but fortunately I managed it without spikes. Going uphill was easier than going down. As the other road was facing south west there was not much snow and going downhill was OK but hard on knees for the incline was steep.

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And lastly

When you do something noble and beautiful and nobody noticed, do not be sad. For the sun every morning is a beautiful spectacle and yet most of the audience still sleeps ~ John Lennon

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A view from the top…

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5th of March was our annual tour/ski day in office. The possibilities were to join downhill or cross country ski or a hiking tour. I chose the third option. I will write and share my experience in another post. For now it’s the tree on the top.

A mind that is stretched by a new experience can never go back to its old dimensions ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Becca’s Sunday Trees