Organised chaos…

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I finally figured out that not every crisis can be managed. As much as we want to keep ourselves safe, we can’t protect ourselves from everything. If we want to embrace life, we also have to embrace chaos.~ Susan Elizabeth Phillips

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Someday, everything will make perfect sense. So for now, laugh at the confusion, smile through the tears, be strong and keep reminding your self that everything happens for a reason. ~ John Mayer

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She had a wild, wandering soul but when she loved, she loved with chaos and that made all the difference. ~ Ariana Dancu

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Becca’s Nurturing Thursday &

Lens-Artists-Photo-Challenge

It’s about people, not politics…

coronaupdates

norway_shuttingNorway shuts down to control Corona

 

WHAT IS SOCIAL DISTANCING AND HOW CAN IT SLOW THE SPREAD OF COVID-19?

How do I practice social distancing?
The CDC defines social distancing as it applies to COVID-19 as “remaining out of congregrate settings, avoiding mass gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.”

This means, says Rivers, “no hugs, no handshakes.”

It’s particularly important—and perhaps obvious—to maintain a that same 6-foot distance from anyone who is demonstrating signs of illness, including coughing, sneezing, or fever.

Along with physical distance, proper hand-washing is important for protecting not only yourself, but others around you—because the virus can be spread even without symptoms.

“Don’t wait for evidence that that there’s circulation [of COVID-19] in your community,” says Rivers. “Go ahead and step up that hand-washing right now, because it really does help to reduce transmission.”

Ref: https://hub.jhu.edu/2020/03/13/what-is-social-distancing/?fbclid=IwAR3Sw6VKoEigNF8jiFKZU6ZFC_PKtbiwi6VnsjWqvlSGk9R_3NhncsAgKmk

 

How to avoid the spread of coronavirus when travelling

Security checks are thought to be the highest risk areas in airports. A study published by researchers from the University of Nottingham and the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare found that half of all plastic luggage trays at security checks were harbouring at least one respiratory disease such as the common cold or influenza.
Scientists have been planning for a pandemic for decades and transport hubs are widely regarded as infection hotspots, with virus transmission rates up to six times higher for those using public transport systems.

Ref: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/science-and-disease/coronavirus-how-avoid-spread-tips-transport/?fbclid=IwAR3fEydd1BcVeUhbLdlMrzcQ9czx4vXqAtUzOexwnWmjVMny2D4jT3acXNk

We Knew Disease X Was Coming. It’s Here Now.

We need to stop what drives mass epidemics rather than just respond to individual diseases.

“We live in dense and highly connected populations. Pandemics are inevitable. The ways we fund health science (slowly, meagerly) and finance health systems (inadequately, inequitably) are simply not up to the task of preventing them.”

Ref: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/27/opinion/coronavirus-pandemics.html?fbclid=IwAR3qp9RhZp82ratipHHDgVxqgSfVdeyb9OEX9IjI-3knK1loSLgP-gYLwWw

Advice from Norwegian institute of public health

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Nurturing Thursday: Respect

When Sudha Murthy, chairman of Infosys Foundation, was called “cattle class” at London’s Heathrow Airport!

 

Here’s an excerpt from Sudha Murty’s ‘Three Thousand Stitches: Ordinary People, Extraordinary Lives’

Last year, I was at the Heathrow International Airport in London about to board a flight. Usually, I wear a sari even when I am abroad, but I prefer wearing a salwar kameez while travelling. So there I was — a senior citizen dressed in typical Indian apparel at the terminal gate. Since the boarding hadn’t started, I sat down and began to observe my surroundings. The flight was bound for Bengaluru and so I could hear people around me chatting in Kannada. I saw many old married couples of my age — they were most likely coming back from the US or UK after helping their children either through childbirth or a new home. I saw some British business executives talking to each other about India’s progress. Some teenagers were busy with the gadgets in their hands while the younger children were crying or running about the gate.

After a few minutes, the boarding announcement was made and I joined the queue. The woman in front of me was a well-groomed lady in an Indo-Western silk outfit, a Gucci handbag and high heels. Every single strand of her hair was in place and a friend stood next to her in an expensive silk sari, pearl necklace, matching earrings and delicate diamond bangles. I looked at the vending machine nearby and wondered if I should leave the queue to get some water.

Suddenly, the woman in front of me turned sideways and looked at me with what seemed like pity in her eyes. Extending her hand, she asked, ‘May I see your boarding pass, please?’

I was about to hand over my pass to her, but since she didn’t seem like an airline employee, I asked, ‘Why?’

‘Well, this line is meant for business class travellers only,’ she said confidently and pointed her finger towards the economy class queue. ‘You should go and stand there,’ she said.

I was about to tell her that I had a business class ticket, but on second thoughts, held back. I wanted to know why she had thought that I wasn’t worthy of being in the business class. So I repeated, ‘Why should I stand there?’

She sighed. ‘Let me explain. There is a big difference in the price of an economy and a business class ticket. The latter costs almost two and a half times more than . . .’I think it is three times more,’ her friend interrupted. ‘Exactly,’ said the woman. ‘So there are certain privileges that are associated with a business class ticket.’

‘Really?’ I decided to be mischievous and pretended not to know.

‘What kind of privileges are you talking about?’

She seemed annoyed. ‘We are allowed to bring two bags but you can only take one. We can board the flight from another, less-crowded queue. We are given better meals and seats. We can extend the seats and lie down flat on them. We always have television screens and there are four washrooms for a small number of passengers.’

Her friend added, ‘A priority check-in facility is available for our bags, which means they will come first upon arrival and we get more frequent flyer miles for the same flight.’

‘Now that you know the difference, you can go to the economy line,’ insisted the woman.

‘But I don’t want to go there.’ I was firm.

The lady turned to her friend. ‘It is hard to argue with these cattle-class people. Let the staff come and instruct her where to go. She isn’t going to listen to us.’

I didn’t get angry. The word ‘cattle class’ was like a blast from the past and reminded me of another incident. One day, I had gone to an upscale dinner party in my home city of Bengaluru. Plenty of local celebrities and socialites were in attendance. I was speaking to some guests in Kannada, when a man came to me and said very slowly and clearly in English, ‘May I introduce myself ? I am…’

It was obvious that he thought that I might have a problem understanding the language.

I smiled. ‘You can speak to me in English.’

‘Oh,’ he said, slightly flabbergasted. ‘I’m sorry. I thought you weren’t comfortable with English because I heard you speaking in Kannada.’

‘There’s nothing shameful in knowing one’s native language. It is, in fact, my right and my privilege. I only speak in English when somebody can’t understand Kannada.’

The line in front of me at the airport began moving forward and I came out of my reverie.

The two women ahead were whispering among themselves, ‘Now she will be sent to the other line. It is so long now! We tried to tell her but she refused to listen to us.’

When it was my turn to show my boarding pass to the attendant, I saw them stop and wait a short distance away, waiting to see what would happen. The attendant took my boarding pass and said brightly, ‘Welcome back! We met last week, didn’t we?’

‘Yes,’ I replied. She smiled and moved on to the next traveller.

I walked a few steps ahead of the women intending to let this go, but then I changed my mind and came back.

‘Please tell me, what made you think that I couldn’t afford a business class ticket? Even if I didn’t have one, was it really your prerogative to tell me where I should stand? Did I ask you for help?’

The women stared at me in silence.

‘You refer to the term “cattle class”. Class does not mean possession of a huge amount of money,’ I continued, unable to stop myself from giving them a piece of my mind.

‘There are plenty of wrong ways to earn money in this world. You may be rich enough to buy comfort and luxuries, but the same money doesn’t define class or give you the ability to purchase it. Mother Teresa was a classy woman. So is Manjul Bhargava, a great mathematician of Indian origin. The concept that you automatically gain class by acquiring money is an outdated thought process.’

I left without waiting for a reply.
Inspired by Becca’s Nurturing Thursday

Nurturing Thursday – Insulin

The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

14th November is “World Diabetes Day”.

https://worlddiabetesday.org/about/2019-theme/

A story about today——

Today is the birthday of a man who made miracles happen. In 1920, a four year old boy Terry Ryder diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. In those days, the only way to save diabetes patients was to put them on a starvation diet. In July 1922, Terry weighed less than 12 kg & could not take 4 steps by himself. He was one of the first put on Fredrick Banting’s new discovery. Within 2 weeks he started gaining weight. By September Terry was healthy.

Terry was just one of thousands of children saved around the world by Fredrick Banting’s miracle cure for diabetes. Also adults and children around the world now take this miracle treatment for granted.

When Fredrick Banting discovered insulin, he refused to put his name on the patent. He felt it was unethical for a doctor to profit from a discovery that would save lives. Banting’s co-inventors, James Collip and Charles Best, sold the insulin patent to the University of Toronto for a mere $1. They wanted everyone who needed their medication to be able to afford it.

 

Inspired by Becca’s Nurturing Thursday

Monday Message

Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful ~Albert Schweitzer

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Many are travelers.

Many are believers.

Still,

Buy and support small vendors,

outside temples, churches or any other religious places.

It’s not about the belief but

helping hard working individuals,

to live with dignity.

-Rupali

आपका क्या ख़याल है 2.

क्या आप का दिल साफ़ है…

आजकल अख़बार, टीवी, सोशल मिडिया सब जगह पर हमारे देश में होने वाले हादसों की खबरों को पढ़ कर बेहद तालीफ़ होती है. इंसान और दरिंदों में फ़रक है भी या नहीं  ऐसे सवाल उठते हैं।  हादसे दिल दहला देने वाले हैं।  कोई ऐसा कैसे कर सकता है हम बस यही सोचते रह जाते हैं। सभी गुनाहगारों को जल्द से जल्द कड़ी से कड़ी सज़ा मिलनी चाहिए। लेकिन क्या आपने इस बात पर गौर किया है,

इन नीच लोगों की वजह से हमने तमाम अच्छे लोगों को भी कटघरे में खड़ा कर दिया है। अब किसी का पुरुष होना उसे दोषी समझने के लिए काफी होगा। हर अच्छी नज़र में हमें मिलावट दिखाई देगी। कोई सच्चे दिल से मदद करने के लिए आगे बढ़ा तो उस पर शक किया जायेगा।

मुझे लगता है ये बात हमारी आने वाली पीढ़ियों के लिए खतरनाक साबित होगी।  शायद लोगों को हर मोड़ पर अपने साफ़ दिल होने की दलीलें पेश करनी पड़ेगी और हम एक साफ-सुथरे समाज से वंचित हो जायेंगे।