La Jolla Cove

It’s almost 3 weeks since we returned from the US but there were many things going on at the same time restricting me to arrange my photos. Now I shall recall and make respective posts.

Our first destination was San Diego. Actually we landed in San Francisco, collected our baggage and checked in for a domestic flight to San Diego.  After reading all the suggestions on the internet we thought it would be a good idea to book a late flight . You know what, we were out without any problem apart from the hour we were in pass control queue.

Have you ever felt that the service for the queue you are waiting in is the slowest one for no reason when others are passing by quickly. Anyways after putting stamps on our passport  and returning it to us, the officer was in mood for some light discussion on immigrants. The irony was both parties belong to the same category 😀

As it was quite early, we decided to try our luck by asking for the seats on the earlier flight. I think we would have granted all our wishes on “that” day. The seats were rebooked for the fee of $25 each. Can you believe? This is not gonna happen here.

I am sharing a group of images for Jo’s (Monday) walk,  taken at the La Jolla Cove in San Diego.

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La Jolla Cove is a small, picturesque cove and beach that is surrounded by cliffs in La Jolla, San Diego, California. The Cove is protected as part of a marine reserve; underwater it is very rich in marine life, and is popular with snorkelers, swimmers and scuba divers.

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There are hundreds of sea lions that call the La Jolla Cove home, sometimes being seen in the deeper-water parts of the Cove or basking on rocks. All sea animals in this area are protected by law, including the orange Garibaldi fish, which are unusually common in the Cove.  (I didn’t get chance to see even one 😦 )

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The cove is also home to hundreds of cormorants and brown pelicans and some other species of birds. I am not sure about other species of birds but quadron of pelicans and flight of cormorants were all over.

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From the park at the top of the Cove, there are a few steps down on each side to a “gallery” area with a lot of benches. This gallery includes the entrance to the lifeguard station, where the lifeguard’s chalkboard shows useful information updated throughout the day. From the gallery level there are two steep sets of concrete steps that lead down to the beach itself, although visitors often have to step on rocks to get all the way down to the sand.

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Some of you might have noticed that some images were taken in the evening and some in broad daylight. Yes we visited it twice with two different hosts who were incredibly supportive.

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Back to Business/Busyness

Hello friends, I hope all is good at your end!

I am overwhelmed by your kindness and would like to thank each and everyone of you for supporting my scheduled posts.

Here is my first regular post for “floral friday” after Hong Kong and Tokyo trip. The picture was taken in Botanical garden in Hong Kong. I shall soon be writing detailed posts on both the cities including travel, accommodation, food, culture and sight seeing information.

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I have taken a great deal of photos and will need time to sort and work on them.  Most important is I will not keep you waiting forever 🙂

Have a nice weekend!

 

A tale of 5 cities: Part 2 – Belmonte Calabro

The second (small) town,  we visited was picturesque  “Belmonte Calabro”, also in Calabria (Southern Italy).  It is perched on a hilltop on the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea.  It was founded in 1270.  Belmonte was besieged several times but not being a history person with proper historical facts, I would not make any statements on it.

Belmonte can be reached by road through the SS18 State Road (Tirrena Inferiore). The town has a station on the main line from Naples to Reggio Calabria. It’s a wonderful place for a short visit. If you are travel with a hire car you will be able to explore some of the green hilly countryside inland  and  discover traditional Calabrese villages and landscape.

The first place we visited in our trip was Amantea.

Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belmonte_Calabro

A tale of 5 cities: Part 1 – Amantea

The first city  town is Amantea. It’s in Calabria region of southern part of Italy.  “Lamezia Terme” international airport is the closest international airport. Many resorts/hotels provide pick and drop shuttle services for their customers. For those who prefer train, the main Naples-Reggio di Calabria railway line passes through town, train station is well-connected to “Rome Termini” train station (several trains per day).

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Going up to the Castle (Byzantine fortress):

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Lovely cobbled streets:

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Collegiata di San Biagio:

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The Castle campus:amantea_03amantea_05amantea_06amantea_07

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Back in the town:

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We had a well organised 7/9 course Italian sea food dinner at restaurant “Le Clarisse”. We reached the place little after sunset but had spectacular view of Tyrrhenian sea and the food was outstanding, and so the wine selection. It’s a perfect place for special dinner.

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The picture of Hotel Le Clarisse from their web site:

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A place worth to taste gelato is bar Sicoli. I tasted their Pistache flavour. It was amazing.

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The town lies on the Tyrrhenian coast between Paola and Lamezia Terme. It has a very attractive old centre on a hill above the modern town and a long stretch of beach. Off the main tourist trail, Amantea is a nice town to visit for a brief exploration, a short stay on the route south, or a quiet and relaxing holiday.

Main sights

  • The Rocca (Castle). First built by the Byzantines, it was strengthened by the Arabs. The current cylindrical tower is however to the Norman-Hohenstaufen age. It was long besieged by Charles of Anjou’s troops in 1269. It was nearly destroyed during the French siege in 1806-1807. It is now a public structure, but is abandoned.
  • Church of San Bernardino.
  • Palazzo delle Clarisse (17th century). The palace was built in the early seventeenth century as the Convent of the Poor Claires (Clarisse) and has remained a convent until 1806 when the French, as a result of the siege of Amantea, confiscated it along with other church properties and then sold it to the Marquis de Luca di Lizzano who made it his noble residence. The Marquis De Luca lived in the palace until 1977. Following a period of severe neglect and decay, the building was then purchased and restored by the current owner, Prof. Fausto Perri. The Palazzo delle Clarisse now hosts cultural and commercial activities such as concerts, exhibitions and paintings by the masters of the Atelier of Copyists, a highly specialized Italian laboratory with great tradition as well as a restaurant with a beautiful view of the sea.

References: