Colours I enjoyed during Easter week

Wherever you go, go with all your heart ~Confucius

In Norway, it’s normal to board a plane through both the front and the rear doors.

Hurray! Last week all of us managed to get a couple of days break to visit Alicante, Spain. Our last family trip outside Norway was in 2019, then we were in Florence. The selection criteria for the destination was quite simple, “a sunny place”. We were quite lucky to be able to experience Easter in Spanish way.

This is Easter in Spain. A fitting reminder that Easter is not just about eggs and bunnies; Spain celebrates Easter week with much more dignity than many other countries. It is one of the most important events in the Christian calendar and Spain treats it with the respect it deserves.

People carry enormous statues of saints on wooden platforms, which have been lovingly created by great artists throughout the centuries. There is an atmosphere of mourning, which can seem oppressive to onlookers, particularly when you see many penitents in hooded cloaks with just slits for their eyes. The mood lightens on Easter Sunday, with church bells ringing throughout the land as the Resurrection of Christ is celebrated.

The silence is unbearable. You catch your breath as you try not to make a noise. Thousands of people line the streets, but no-one says a word. Then the sound of marching feet fills the air. It’s the only thing you can hear. Thousands of penitents parade in complete silence. It’s dark too. The only light is from the lanterns of the people marching by, which add to the sombre and somewhat eerie situation. It’s very emotional and some people are choking up at the dramatic scene unfolding before their eyes.

The story of Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection is re-enacted with much pomp and ceremony in many towns throughout the country. However, two of the best places to spend Easter are in the Alicante region – Elche and Orihuela – just a few kilometres apart.

To give us company in this foreign land, rains and strong wind followed us 😀😂. Anyways, it was Spain hence nothing to worry. We thoroughly enjoyed the warm weather and sunshine.

Here are some images taken at the fabulous Castle of Santa Bárbara, located on the top of Mount Benacantil overlooking the historic town, the port and the Bay of Alicante.

Everyday my fitbit crossed the mark of 20000 steps and 2000 calories but then I never counted the calories I consumed 😀

Jo’s Monday Walk.

Lens artists photo challenge

Who adds sugar to a glass of fresh squeezed orange juice?

Reference for the text : https://www.myguidealicante.com/travel-articles/passion-reigns-in-alicante-at-easter

Six Word Saturday (the title 😀 )

Random 64: A view for free

I don’t have to chase extraordinary moments to find happiness – it’s right in front of me if I am paying attention and practicing gratitude ~Brene Brown

I miss Nurturing Thursdays. I hope Becca Givens is doing fine.

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झरना बहता रहा। 

पत्ते रंग बदलते रहे। 

हम किताबों में उलझे,

जिंदगी के मायने ढूंढते रहे। 

-रुपाली 

Gaudi’s Work: Nature, Religion and Geometry

Those who look for the laws of Nature as a support for their new works collaborate with the creator ~ Antoni Gaudí

The Sagrada Família is a one-of-a-kind temple, for its origins, foundation and purpose. Fruit of the work of genius architect Antoni Gaudí, the project was promoted by the people for the people. Five generations now have watched the Temple progress in Barcelona. Today, more than 135 years after the laying of the cornerstone, construction continues on the Basilica.

Gaudi embedded religious symbolism in each aspect of La Sagrada Familia, creating a visual representation of Christian beliefs. He designed three iconic facades for the basilica, the Glory, Nativity, and Passion facades, facing south, east, and west, respectively. The sculpting of the Nativity facade recalls smooth, intricate corbelling and was overseen by Gaudi. 

Reference: https://www.archdaily.com/438992/ad-classics-la-sagrada-familia-antoni-gaudi

The columns are inclined and branched-like trees.
The straight line belongs to Man. The curved line belongs to God ~ Antoni Gaudi

During our stay in Barcelona, three times we were around Sagrada Familia but only once to enter it.

The Basílica de la Sagrada Família

History of the Temple – Sagrada Família

And if you are interested in mathematics, do check – AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE GEOMETRICAL ELEMENTS IN GAUDI’S ARCHITECTURE

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One can find the earlier posts on Barcelona:

Barcelona Part 1

Barcelona Part 2

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Lens artisits photo challenge

Jos Monday Walk

The astounding interior of Gaudi’s Building

Mosaic created by putting together broken ceramic tiles
The decorated pillars
In the back garden
Blue light well: Looking up
Looking down
Rounded arches – Service area in the loft

These images were taken during our visit to Casa Batlló in Barcelona.  It was designed by Antoni Gaudí, and is considered one of his masterpieces. In 2005, Casa Batlló became an UNESCO World Heritage Site among the other works of Antoni Gaudí.

Six Word Saturday

Monday Walk

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This is the second post on my Barcelona visit.

You can find the first one here: Barcelona