Weekend 100: Summer at home 2

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Walking in surroundings is included in our daily routine now. I picked a couple of images from our walk last week.

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Flowers are blooming everywhere here and almost every house has beautiful display. A couple of days ago we took a short walk to appreciate gardens in our neighbourhood.

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Our town walk was concluded with coffee and cake. No rains and wind and even the temperature was just perfect resulting lot of people outside. Gladly it was convenient to main social distancing while seating outside. July is vacation month in Norway but our borders are still closed and moreover this year people are adviced to spend their vacations in Norway. Hope this will help local business which rely mostly on tourists.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Becca’s Sunday Trees

Second entry to last week’s lens artists photo challenge: Summer

Here is my first entry for the same challenge : CLICK

Summer at home…

“Live at home”~ George Washington Carver

This is the first summer I am not travelling to India or any other places. The travel restrictions have forced me to stay here. In the beginning I felt sad but then I started thinking about “Something good will always come out of something bad”. 

I started enjoying my everyday hike/walk and I decided to work on my front garden.

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My first Clemantis

Everything that slows us down and forces patience, everything that sets us back into the slow circles of nature, is a help. Gardening is an instrument of grace.~ May Sarton

 

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Daylily

Plants want to grow; they are on your side as long as you are reasonably sensible.~ Anne Wareham

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Soir de Paris
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Coral Dawn
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Catmint

The love to spend time in my little garden (there are not so many plants yet) and I am glad I trusted my instincts.

For lens-artists-photo-challenge

Sunday Trees: Silhouette

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You cannot do silhouettes in fantasy. Ah, no, you must be faithful. It is, the art, a, what you call, paradox. It is always that you must be simple, and then, if you are simple, you will stimulate the imagination of the observer.  ~Ugo Mochi

For Sunday Trees

Our default weather is back in action. It’s cold and rain from last night temperaure is around 11degree. Sigh!

Weekend 99: To heal

Sometimes we get busy in things we can’t bypass which means less time for hobby. I couldn’t get enough time to work on a post for last couple of days but all was for a good cause and so no regrets.

In the new normal, we try to maintain a rotuine of taking walk everyday. No hard exercising is possible as the gyms are still closed, a preferred choice is walking for atleast an hour ++.  Here are some images from our recent walks.

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What happens when people open their hearts?
They get better.
~ Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood

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The final stage of healing is using what happens to you to help other people. That is healing in itself. ~ Gloria Steinem

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For Nurturing Thursday this week.

For Jo’s Monday Walk

Goodbye June

During summer, nearly all Norwegian goats/sheeps are released for open grazing that generally lasts for around three months. I took this image near a barn in May but now almost all barns are empty.

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Unique experience

Approximately two million sheep are grazing in the outlying fields of Norway every summer. That’s unique, and something that you won’t experience elsewhere.

“In Norway, the resource situation is different than in the rest of Scandinavia and other comparable countries. Only three per cent of Norway’s landmass is arable land, but 45 percent is usable or excellent grazing land”, says Tone Våg, sheep farmer and leader of the Norwegian Sheep and Goat Association.

Våg continues: “Norwegian agriculture is dependent on the extra resource of the outlying fields, and pasture is an important source of income for Norwegian farms”.

Boundless sheep

Sheep grazing in outlying fields have free access to whatever they want to eat. That makes the Norwegian sheep happy.

“When you’re taking the sheep to their summer grazing land in the mountains you can hear the happy sounds from the herd. You can tell from how they’re acting that they remember from year to year”, Våg says.

Grazing without fences allows the sheep to act more in tune with their instincts, and they naturally divide into smaller groups with individuals closely related to one another.

If you occasionally encounter sheep far into the wild, you normally don’t need to worry: “Sheep recognises where they are, and they know where they are going” Våg says.

The green caretakers

Whilst out grazing, it occasionally happens that sheep get ill, get stuck or lost – or that they encounter predators. They are, however, not completely left to themselves.

“It’s statutory to check on flock at least once a week during the whole summer. Therefore, it’s not only the tourists who can enjoy the sight of sheep grazing in the nature. I feel privileged that I can take my family with me into the mountains to look after the animals as a part of my regular work”, Våg says.

Another factor is that grazing sheep are preventing the landscape from overgrowing and maintains the biodiversity in the Norwegian nature. According to Våg, almost 300 endangered species are dependent on the Norwegian cultural landscape.

“It’s not overgrown nature the tourists come to see”, says the farmer.

RESOURCE: https://www.visitnorway.com/places-to-go/fjord-norway/happy-sheep/

My first entry to Photo a day Challenge