A walk in Vigeland Sculpture Park

This week we shall take a tour to the Vigeland sculpture park in Oslo. The Vigeland Park is the world’s largest sculpture park made by a single artist, and is one of Norway’s most popular tourist attractions. The park is open to visitors all year round.

The Main Gate in granite and wrought iron facing Kirkeveien marks the beginning of the 850 meter long axis that leads over the Bridge to the Fountain on to the Monolith and ends in the Wheel of life. The Main Gate consists of five large gates and two small pedestrian gates in wrought iron. Railings curve outwards on each side and end in two copper-roofed gate houses, topped by guilded weather vanes.

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The gates were designed in 1926. The upper parts, surmounted by lanterns, were redesigned in the 1930’s to replace the older ones. The wrought iron was carried out in a forge which was constructed next to the Vigeland Museum, south of the park. The Main Gate was erected in 1942 and was financed by a Norwegian bank.

joswalk_03sep18_2joswalk_03sep18_3The unique sculpture park is Gustav Vigeland’s lifework with more than 200 sculptures in bronze, granite and wrought iron. Vigeland was also in charge of the design and architectural layout of the park. The Vigeland Park was mainly completed between 1939 and 1949.

Most of the sculptures are placed in five units along an 850 meter long axis: The Main gate, the Bridge with the Children’s playground, the Fountain, the Monolith plateau and the Wheel of Life.

To the north inside the Main Entrance stands Vigeland’s self-portrait (1942). Dressed in his everyday working clothes, with hammer and chisel in hand, he stands as a signature of his own work.

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Among the sculptures in the park the Fountain has the longest history. The idea of a monumental bronze fountain had occupied the mind of Vigeland since the turn of the century. A sketch in plaster, that resembles today’s fountain, attracted great enthusiasm when exhibited in 1906.

Around the first world war Vigeland enlarged his fountain project with a number of large granite groups. And in 1919 an enormous granite column also had become part of the plan. It was not until 1924, when the city left the Frogner fields to Vigeland, that the fountain found its final location. Some changes were made from the original sketch.

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The 20 tree groups were all modelled between 1906 and 1914. Beneath the crown of the trees the life of man, from cradle to grave, unfolds. Our time on earth is at the same time only a part of an eternal cycle with no beginning and no end. After the tree group with the skeleton which is about to decay in nature, follows a tree full of children: From death arises new life.

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This tour was inspired by Jo’s Monday walk theme and since we see different actions in these sculptures, I thought it’s a good idea to link it to this week’s lens-artists-photo-challenge.

In earlier posts, I have exhibited various sculptures in the park, like in  The Monolith.

The information given in the post is taken from park’s website  References: http://www.vigeland.museum.no/en/vigeland-park

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A short visit to botanical garden

Last week I had an unplanned visit to a botanical garden. Though the summer is already gone in this part of the world the garden was nonetheless very green and perfect for relaxing walk. The garden holds a large and varied collection of trees and shrubs planted in a systematic fashion after plant families. Also there are two green houses The Palm House from 1868 and The Victoria House from 1876 present exotic plants from other parts of the world.

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The buildings are surrounded by lush green trees
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Diphylleia cymosa
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One of the many walkways
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A grand tree!
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Rock garden
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Another view
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Remains from the season
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Garden landscape
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Garden landscape 2
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Ageing

Flowers from well maintained greenhouses.

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I heard about the giant waterlillies from amazon which I missed unfortunately.

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I could not spend a lot of time exploring garden and taking more diverse and detailed images still I decided to share my experience with you all for Jo’s Monday walk.

I hope you like this short walk. Next year I shall plan a thorough visit.

 

Sunrise over the Charles bridge in Prague

Charles Bridge is a 14th century bridge linking the two sides of Prague, across the Vltava river. One fine morning in April we decided to take an early morning walk to watch sunrise over the famous Charles bridge.

The shot was taken at 5:29 am from the hotel window.

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The show begins!
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Take the stairs!
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Looking aound!
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The castle!
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People from our tribe!
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Oops the show ends!

The last image was taken at 5:55.

This post is inspired by Jo’s Monday Walk theme.

A tour to Norwegian cherry farm

For Jo’s Monday walk, today we shall take a tour to a farming village called Lærdal in Norway where major agriculture production includes potatoes, apricots, oats, raspberries and most of all cherries. Sweet cherries or Morello cherries, originally from China now grown in Norway are popular and are sold in majority of grocery stores in Norway. The cherry production in this region is more than 200 tons and accounts for half of the total cherry production in Norway.

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To learn about Norwegian farm life and its challenges we took a guided tour/walk with one of the renowened farmers of this region.  His talk also includes the following topics:

  • Cherries – varieties, root stocks, tree architecture and cover systems in operation
  • Testing and benchmarking for the cherry varieties:  The Canadian varieties from Summerland reseach: Van, Lapins and Sweet Hart, and the European: Regina (Germany), Kordia  (Czeck rep) and Girgia (Italian)
  • Ideas around robotics and drone monitoring in fruit orchards

Long growing season, soft light, good soil and plenty of fresh water give the cherries the good taste. Cherries or Moreller tastes best when they have a deep dark red color and kept on room temperature.

The Norwegian agriculture has by far the strictest rules. It’s one of the reasons why one can safely eat cherries and other norwegian proctuct.  Our tour also included

  •  Visit to Lærdal Grønt Pack House to study the operation of cherry grading machine that will deliver more then 200 tons of cherries to the Norwegian market this year (about 50% of Norwegian production)
  • Discussing ideas around big data and cherry grading based on the 30 pictures pr cherry data optical grading system
  • Visit to “Smak av Sogn Landhandel” local & regional food and drink shop

Monday walk to “the Norwegian book town”

For Jo’s  Monday walk this week let us have a short walk to the Norwegian book town (den norske bokbyen) which is situated in Mundal, the centre of Fjærland.

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MILES OF SECONDHAND BOOKS IN QUAINT BOOKSHOPS:

The Norwegian Book Town is an experience out of the ordinary, situated in a bewitchingly beautiful spot between fjord and glacier in Western Norway. Between May and September, various bookshops are open every day 10am-6pm, some of them are combined with a café, art gallery and souvenir shop and even hotel. Numerous events are arranged all season.

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How is it possible having thousands of second-hand books in a small 280-inhabitant rural town?

The Norwegian Book Town in Fjærland started out very modestly in 1995, and now stocks about 2.5 miles of shelving, filled with books, in a variety of abandoned buildings – from ferry waiting rooms, stables and local banks to post office and grocery shop. Besides taking care of books, the idea here was also to preserve the old buildings, this makes some of the shops rather exceptional and characteristic.

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Three large shops are selling only second-hand books: Straumsvågs Antikvariat and Den norske bokbyen A/S. Solstice bookfairs are arranged every year in May/ June.

Requests by e-mail, post, fax or telephone are served all through the year, and the book town enjoys a lively postal order business. During winter, the office hours are 9am-2pm every weekday.

During my short visit on weekend I was able to get two books by Ernest Hemmingway but of course I shall visit this place again.

Resource: https://bokbyen.no/en/

 

My Monday walk: Nothing so special

I happened to go on a light hike/walk today, which resulted in my first ever contribution to Jo’s Monday walk. Usually I go on hikes/walks on weekends and record them in my weekend posts. The weather and heavy brainstormming at work persued me to use my office training time for a short hike.

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Going up and up!

I like walking in natural surroundings

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Still going up
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I love this corner
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Still up and more in woods
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One does not feel tired in such surroundings
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Light and shade
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Blueberries
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Very near to destination

It is obligatory to take at least one picture from the top. Do you see a big cruise ship?

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Wild lovely bluebell flowers cheering us

Time to go back to office

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A local family enjoying summer
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Time to say adios

Thank you for joing me on the journey 😀

After going back to office I continued my work for an hour or so.