The Old Man and the Sea!

I am not a reviewer and reviewing Ernest Hemingway is not my business. A lot has already been written about the author and the book and probably future generations will have their share in coming times.

There are more than 300 million links discussing quotes, characters and analyzing various events of the book.

So what I want to say about the book. Instead of writing the text here, I took photo of the page and am giving it here.

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I was surprised and impressed after reading this. Such an excellent way to keep healthy. Moreover it was available to all fishermen. Such an important and unique piece of information about the fishing community. I have never heard of such community service. The book was published in 1952 which mean the story happened in Cuba around 1950’s.

India has 8,129 kilometres (5,051 mi) of marine coastline, 3,827 fishing villages and 1,914 traditional fish landing centers. A general story I heard about poor fishermen in India is they would spend the money  they have earned in drinking cheap alcohol. This is so devastating.

Has anyone know about such service in other countries in recent times or history?

While looking for some information, I found information on history of cod liver oil.

“Vikings would get livers from the cod and every house would have a drum full of fermented livers and the oil that rose to the top was used for everything from heat, to cooking oil, to a condiment, to using the oil as fuel for a wick.  They would take spoonful upon leaving their homes.”

Reference: http://www.mcjazz.f2s.com/CodLiverOil.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Monday walk to “the Norwegian book town”

For Jo’s  Monday walk this week let us have a short walk to the Norwegian book town (den norske bokbyen) which is situated in Mundal, the centre of Fjærland.

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MILES OF SECONDHAND BOOKS IN QUAINT BOOKSHOPS:

The Norwegian Book Town is an experience out of the ordinary, situated in a bewitchingly beautiful spot between fjord and glacier in Western Norway. Between May and September, various bookshops are open every day 10am-6pm, some of them are combined with a café, art gallery and souvenir shop and even hotel. Numerous events are arranged all season.

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How is it possible having thousands of second-hand books in a small 280-inhabitant rural town?

The Norwegian Book Town in Fjærland started out very modestly in 1995, and now stocks about 2.5 miles of shelving, filled with books, in a variety of abandoned buildings – from ferry waiting rooms, stables and local banks to post office and grocery shop. Besides taking care of books, the idea here was also to preserve the old buildings, this makes some of the shops rather exceptional and characteristic.

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Three large shops are selling only second-hand books: Straumsvågs Antikvariat and Den norske bokbyen A/S. Solstice bookfairs are arranged every year in May/ June.

Requests by e-mail, post, fax or telephone are served all through the year, and the book town enjoys a lively postal order business. During winter, the office hours are 9am-2pm every weekday.

During my short visit on weekend I was able to get two books by Ernest Hemmingway but of course I shall visit this place again.

Resource: https://bokbyen.no/en/

 

Relieved for now!

I would like to contribute to Becca’s Nurturing Thursday theme (on Monday due to valid reason) with one of my favourite quotes:

Wherever you go, go with all your heart ~ Confucius

With all busyness during my vacation in Decembe I managed to buy a few books. One of them was “Parv” (Epoch/age) written by Dr. S.L.Bhyrappa based on epic “Mahabharat”. It was originally written in Kannada. I got it’s marathi translation by Uma Kulkarni.

For last two weeks apart from doing obligatory chores at home and at office, I spent my time in reading this 700+ pages novel.

Right from my chidlhood days I had read/heard stories related to Mahabharat. Almost 2 decades ago after reading/spending time on “Yugant” by Dr. Iravati Karve and “Vyasparv” by Durgabai Deshmukh I got real interest in various characters of the great epic.

After hearing about “Parv” by Bhyrappa I had but one aim to get it and to read it. Parva is unique in terms of the complete absence of any episode that has the element of divine intervention found in the original. This is what I like most. It seems more real than the version I had read/heard before.

The book has been translated in many languages including in English  with title “Parva: A tale of War, Peace, Death, Love, God and Man ” by Tr. K. Raghavendra Rao.

I would love to hear about your experience with this book or in general on Mahabharat!

Happy reading!

Inspirational Quote: cont. from yesterday

There is another wonderful message by Wayne Dyer which goes perfect with yesterday’s Nurturing Thursday theme.

Give yourself more opportunities for privacy, when you are not bombarded with duties and obligations. Privacy is not a rejection of those you love; it is your deserved respite for recharging your batteries.

After celebrating festival with family and friends now its time to relax and recharge your batteries. Get yourself a cup of tea/coffee/hot chocolate and a book, and relax in your cosy corner. Take a deep breath.

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